272-264 BC

Final Reduction and Political Consolidation of Italy

The departure of Pyrrhus left the cities of Southern Italy to the mercy of Rome. Milo, Pyrrhus’ lieutenant, held the citadel at Tarentum. None of the cities that joined Pyrrhus ceased resisting Roman attempts at hegemony. The Samnites, Lucanians, Bruttians continued guerilla warfare in the mountains.

Extension of Roman Hegemony in Italy after the end of the Pyrrhic War
With the departure of Pyrrhus, the Romans were free to settle matters in Italy. Most of the cities submitted. A few, such as the Samnites and Lucanians, continued to resist by employing guerilla tactics. The map at left shows the year in which a city state or a people submitted to Roman rule.

In 272 BC, L. Papirius Cursor the younger and Sp. Carvilius, who had crushed the Samnites at the end of the 3rd Samnite war, were elected consuls.

Papirius invested Tarentum and in the meantime received submission of the Lucanians and Bruttians.

Carvilius attacked the Samnites and scattered their forces. This concluded the end of the “4th Samnite War”.